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Organisational Abuse

The following list includes some indicators of ‘possible’ organisational abuse:

  • Batch care – lack of individual care programmes
  • Deprived environmental conditions and lack of stimulation
  • Illegal confinement or restrictions

Your Rights- Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards Standard Authorisation)

  • Inappropriate care of possessions, clothing and living area
  • Inappropriate physical intervention
  • Inappropriate use of medical procedures such as enemas, catheterisation
  • Inappropriate use of power or control
  • Inflexible services based on convenience of the provider rather than the person receiving services
  • Lack of personal clothes and belongings
  • No flexibility in bedtime routine and/or deliberate waking
  • People left on a commode or toilet for long periods of time
  • People referred to, or spoken to with disrespect
  • Service user removed from the home or establishment, without discussion with other appropriate people or agencies because staff are unable to manage the behaviour
  • Un-homely or stark living environments.

807 News: A daughter has released shocking secretly-filmed footage of her 95-year-old mum being abused by two carers.

In September 2017 a daughter has released shocking secretly-filmed footage of her 95-year-old mum being abused by two carers.

Lynne Nuttall installed a hidden camera in her mum Marjorie’s room after becoming concerned about the treatment she was receiving at Macclesfield-based Prestbury House Care Home.

She has now released the harrowing footage after her mum’s abusers Piotre Ciecielowski, 26, and Pedro Dias, 21, were spared jail. The footage, shows Ciecielowski and Dias verbally abusing their victim, who also has dementia, as they get her ready for bed.

She has now released the harrowing footage after her mum’s abusers Piotre Ciecielowski, 26, and Pedro Dias, 21, were spared jail. The footage, taken on March 31 this year, shows Ciecielowski and Dias verbally abusing their victim, who also has dementia, as they get her ready for bed. Carers shocking abuse of 95 year old woman

The pair admitted ill-treatment while working as carers and were sentenced to nine months in prison, suspended for two years, and ordered to complete 250 hours unpaid work. After the sentencing hearing, the victim’s daughter, Lynne Nuttall, said she had installed a covert camera in her mother’ Marjorie’s room when she became concerned about unexplained injuries.

She said: ‘I was worried mum wasn’t getting the right care. She had bruises on her wrists and I didn’t feel my concerns were being listened to.

Winterbourne View

Winterbourne View Undercover Care The Abuse Exposed – YouTube

19 Jan 2017 – Uploaded by Jim Evans-Hill

Six care workers at the Winterbourne View care home were given prison terms  for “cruel, callous and degrading” abuse of disabled patients.

The judge at Bristol crown court also condemned five other staff members at the private home in Hambrook, South Gloucestershire, who received suspended sentences. Judge Neil Ford told the defendants their behaviour triggered “widespread feelings of revulsion”.

The 11 defendants – nine support workers and two nurses – admitted 38 charges of either neglect or ill-treatment of five people with severe learning difficulties after being secretly recorded by a reporter for the BBC’s Panorama programme.

The report (link below) is the product of NHS England asking Sir Stephen Bubb, chief executive of charity leaders body ACEVO, to make recommendations for a national commissioning framework under which local commissioners would secure community-based support for people with learning disabilities and/or autism. This came after a pledge made in the wake the Winterbourne View scandal – to enable people with learning disabilities and/or autism inappropriately placed in hospital to move to community based support by June 2014 – was missed.

Please click on the link below for the full report:
NHS England: Winterbourne View Report

The Bucks Herald: LSE report reveals “organisational abuse” at Seeley’s House after Freedom of Information request battle

LSE report reveals "organisational abuse" at Seeley's House
Opposition councillors have called for an inquiry after their Freedom of Information request revealed serious failings at a care home administered by Buckinghamshire County Council.

The council announced back in December 2016 that it was taking back the Seeley’s House contract from Bucks Care, a company that they paid £8m to handle respite care for adults with physical and learning disabilities.

An excerpt from the report, titled Seeley’s House Large Scale Enquiry, read: “In November 2016, the Care Quality Commission re-inspected the service and found both continued and additional breaches to the Health and Social Care Act 2008 including environmental hazards and incidents of physical abuse that had not been reported to the local authority, people were not receiving medicines as prescribed and the service failed to act within the core principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005.”

In 2017, the multi-agency Large Scale Enquiry concluded having substantiated the allegation of “organisational abuse”.  Councillor Derrick said investigations were continuing into incidents at Seeley’s House when it was run by Bucks Care. “This only came to light through whistleblowers going to the Care Quality Commission and through the Labour Party asking for papers under the Freedom of Information Act,” she said.

She said: “It is now clear that Seeley’s House has only been operating at two thirds capacity for the last six months.“Vulnerable adults are not getting the respite they are legally entitled to and their carers are getting no rest. On top of this, BCC has had to cover nearly £3 million of debt run up by Bucks Care, so far,” he added.

A spokesman for Buckinghamshire County Council said: “The council took decisive action after last November’s CQC inspection, taking the operation of Seeley’s and Bucks Care back in-house.  “Since then, we’ve been working hard to deliver our improvement plan and, this week, have published the Large Scale Enquiry Report on our website.

“We are expecting that the CQC will publish its updated rating for the service very soon.”

Winterbourne-view-hospital-department-of-health-review-and-response

Wirral Globe: Care watchdog blast for privately-run mental health hospital in Heswall

Care watchdog blast for privately-run mental health hospital in Heswall
A WIRRAL hospital which looked after people with mental health problems failed to meet expected levels of care was forced to send its patients elsewhere before being closed down.

Previously Watchdog the Care Quality Commission had issued two formal warnings to the Regency Hospital in Broad Lane after an inspection found it was failing to meet seven out of eight national standards.

Malcolm Bower-Brown, CQC’s regional director, said: “Our inspection of Regency Hospital Heswall was extremely concerning and we have warned the provider improvements must be made.

Action has been taken to “protect the safety and welfare of the patients” at the privately-run hospital – which provides care and rehabilitation for people sectioned under the Mental Health Act – and all have now left the facility.

When the commission visited the multi-million pound unit in November 2013, inspectors found one ward did not meet the required standards to safely accommodate patients who require a low security environment.

Staff records showed many had not received adequate training and support and did not have the necessary skills to care for patients.

Low staffing levels also led to some patients being unable to take their “section 17” leave granted under the Mental Health Act.

Investigations into serious incidents were not suitably robust and “there was little evidence of any learning or actions having been taken to prevent reoccurrence.”

Malcolm Bower-Brown, CQC’s regional director, said: “Our inspection of Regency Hospital Heswall was extremely concerning and we have warned the provider improvements must be mad

The hospital, on the site of former Heswall Boys’ Camp, sparked concern among residents in 2007 when development first began, with many claiming they had not been informed of its true use.

Graham Hodkinson, Wirral’s director of adult social care, said: “We do not commission placements from Regency Hospital or have any placements there.

“However, safeguarding concerns in relation to individuals at the hospital were reported through our central advice and duty team, which were followed up with the appropriate authorities.

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